bohemea
suicideblonde:

Sasha Pivovarova photographed in Kizhi, Russia by Tim Walker for Vogue UK in 2006
 Michelle Duguid, assistant on the shoot: ‘Four generations of a family lived in this cramped house. We ended up unpacking the clothes in a room where four of the oldest members of the family slept, while Tim set up his tripod in an adjoining room surrounded by a further 17 staring members of the extended family. The two sisters sang us old Russian folk songs about the death of traditional country life, a subject close to our hosts’ hearts. The singing moved Sasha to tears.’

suicideblonde:

Sasha Pivovarova photographed in Kizhi, Russia by Tim Walker for Vogue UK in 2006

Michelle Duguid, assistant on the shoot: ‘Four generations of a family lived in this cramped house. We ended up unpacking the clothes in a room where four of the oldest members of the family slept, while Tim set up his tripod in an adjoining room surrounded by a further 17 staring members of the extended family. The two sisters sang us old Russian folk songs about the death of traditional country life, a subject close to our hosts’ hearts. The singing moved Sasha to tears.’

unconsumption
unconsumption:


Dr. Dan Knapp, 71, is one man who’s reaping the riches of the Zero Waste philosophy. He founded Urban Ore,  a waste recovery business in Berkeley, California in 1980 with his wife  Mary Lou Van Deventer. Last year the company did $2.7 million in sales.
Turning trash into cash was a natural evolution for Knapp. On a whim,  as a college instructor in Springfield, Illinois in the early 1970’s,  he purchased an old six-wheeled farm truck and helped students collect  salvageable material lying about town.
“We were picking up anything,” says Knapp. “We went to a dump and I was appalled by what I saw.”
Then, Knapp recalls, he realized “There’s a business opportunity here.”

More: From Trash to Cash: Small Business Turns Profit with Waste Recovery – ecomagination

unconsumption:

Dr. Dan Knapp, 71, is one man who’s reaping the riches of the Zero Waste philosophy. He founded Urban Ore, a waste recovery business in Berkeley, California in 1980 with his wife Mary Lou Van Deventer. Last year the company did $2.7 million in sales.

Turning trash into cash was a natural evolution for Knapp. On a whim, as a college instructor in Springfield, Illinois in the early 1970’s, he purchased an old six-wheeled farm truck and helped students collect salvageable material lying about town.

“We were picking up anything,” says Knapp. “We went to a dump and I was appalled by what I saw.”

Then, Knapp recalls, he realized “There’s a business opportunity here.”

More: From Trash to Cash: Small Business Turns Profit with Waste Recovery – ecomagination